Oct 112017
 

Hi readers, I’m excited to share another of my Austenesque Top Ten lists with you today!

While many Austenesque stories take place in the Regency era and many take place in modern times, there are a handful that are set somewhere in between.  These stories take Jane Austen’s beloved characters and bring them to new time periods and/or settings.  Sometimes these stories are referred to as ‘alternate universe,’ but I like to use the term – Retellings.  Often times in these stories the setting feels like a character in and of itself.  And I love seeing how authors immerse Jane Austen’s characters and the reader in these unique and diverse settings.

The amount of Austenesque Retellings (that are not modern-day retellings) published may be small, but many of them are such sensational reads I thought it would be fun to highlight my favorites!

Here are 10 fabulous Austenesque retellings that are so deserving of praise and recognition!

* These lists are based only on the novels I have read and reviewed on this blog and are my top ten favorites.

**These lists are subject to change.  

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(in alphabetical order)

1932

Author: Karen M. Cox

Type of Novel: RetellingMature Audiences

My Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

My Review   I   Add to Cart   I   Add to Shelf

“Ms. Cox’s writing style is captivating and charming. I love the time period she chose, the new predicaments she gave the Bennet family, and the intrigue she created about Georgiana.”

 

At the Edge of the Sea

Author: Karen M. Cox

Type of Novel: RetellingMature Audiences

My Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

My Review   I   Add to Cart   I   Add to Shelf

“I was utterly charmed and enthralled by this novel! Having read the other two superb Austenesque novels by Karen Cox, I knew I could expect a high-caliber story rich with dynamic characters, intelligent insights, and evocative prose. At the Edge of the Sea is a poignant and expressive love story that should not be missed!”

Continue reading »

Sep 152017
 

A Thoughtful and Reverent Retelling of Emma

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

While she may be “handsome, clever, and rich,” Emma Woodhouse finds herself living a life not entirely of her own choosing. In 1973 she left the university that was her mother’s alma mater to come home and live with and care for her father who suffered from a debilitating stroke. And even though she is soon to be graduating, she doesn’t have the ability to up and go live a new city or begin a full-time career. But Emma isn’t one to complain. Her family is her world and she would happily sacrifice her freedom to take care of them and be what they need – no questions about it! However, sometimes, Emma cannot help but feel a little envious towards those that are able to lead a different life – whether it be moving away from their hometown, having a noble profession, or just following their dreams…

Even though Emma keeps herself pretty busy with her course work, managing her father’s house, and tending to her father’s care, she has time to lend assistance and guidance to those in her circle of dear friends and family. She touts herself as a “born matchmaker,” but as Emma will soon learn the game of love is often more complex and risky than it seems… Continue reading »

Aug 282017
 

Hi friends!  I hope your Mondays are off to a great start!  As you might already beware, the talented, award-winning author Karen Cox has a new book about to release and it is a retelling of Jane Austen’s Emma!  I can’t tell you how excited I am about this – I love Emma, I love Mr. Knightley, and I love Karen Cox’s writing!  Karen has prepared IMHO an amazingly insightful and astute post about Emma Woodhouse.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

Emma Woodhouse: Jane Austen’s gift to you, the modern woman.

At first glance, it seems impossible that a 200-year-old character from Regency England could speak to me, a modern-day reader, but Jane Austen’s Emma Woodhouse is, in my opinion, a heroine for modern times.

A lot of readers aren’t too thrilled with Emma, and it’s easy to see why. It’s all about her (except it really isn’t—more on that later.) For heaven’s sake, even the novel itself is named after her! From the first phrase of the book, we are primed to envy her when we learn she is “handsome, clever, and rich.” She’s the kind of heroine that sparks a reader’s resentment—for what she has and for the blessings conferred on her by birth and good genes, through no effort of her own. In the little town of Highbury and on her estate, Hartfield, she is privileged with a capital P.

And then there’s her behavior during the novel. A gentleman’s daughter with a limited view of the world, she comes off as vain about her own intelligence and her dubious importance. She’s nosey. She’s a snob. She’s wrong-headed, self-deluding, and headstrong. No wonder Austen called her “a heroine whom no one but myself will much like.” Continue reading »