Mar 232019
 

An Unsuspecting and Undistinguished Character Transforms into a Heroine!

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

With three Bennet daughters marrying for love at the close of Pride and Prejudice, the two remaining unmarried daughters (Mary and Kitty) have always aroused curiosity and speculation. What kind of futures are in store for these ladies? Do they find their own happiness? Do they marry for love? Many writers have been inspired to pick up their pens and compose tales that flesh out these characters and continue their lives beyond what Jane Austen wrote. While there are dozens of stories that spotlight Mary Bennet, there are decidedly less that feature Kitty Bennet, who is famous for her coughing and for mindlessly being under Lydia’s influence. In Carrie Kablean’s debut novel she shines a spotlight on Kitty and reveals the events of Kitty’s life the year after her sisters marry. Continue reading »

Mar 042019
 

Kitty Bennet Realizes Her Purpose

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

Note: The Exile: The Countess Visits Longbourn is the fifth installment in The Bennet Wardrobe series, and it is recommended that readers read The Keeper: Mary Bennet’s Extraordinary Adventure, Henry Fitzwilliam’s War, The Exile: Kitty Bennet and the Belle Époque, and Lizzy Bennet Meets the Countess prior to reading this book. This story does not work as a stand-alone. Continue reading »

Dec 102018
 

Happy Monday, everyone! I am so excited to welcome back author, Sophie Turner to Austenesque Reviews today. You may recall that Sophie is in the midst of an extensive sequel series for Pride and Prejudice titled Constant Love.  So far this series has focused primarily on Mr. and Mrs. Darcy and Georgiana and her new husband, and just last month, Sophie released the third installment – A Season Lost! We hope you enjoy Sophie Turner’s post as she shares more about the Georgette Heyer influences in her writing!

I’ve written a lot about how I wanted to merge the worlds of Jane Austen and Patrick O’Brian in writing my Constant Love series, but another influence I haven’t written as much about is Georgette Heyer. In many ways, Heyer’s world is justas disparate as Austen’s and O’Brian’s, even though they’re all set within the Georgian/Regency eras. Although Heyer sometimes set her romances within the countryside, I think her most memorable novels are the ones that bring us within the rarefied air of the London drawing rooms, ballrooms, and gentlemen’s clubs of the Regency ton.

It’s a world of rakes, corinthians, rogues, dandies, and the charming young (or almost old enough to be on the shelf) ladies who fall in love with them. Jane Austen gives us characters who belong within that Heyerish world – Fitzwilliam Darcy, certainly, would have fit among that cast – but we see them almost exclusively in the countryside, or occasionally at a watering-place. No Austen heroine participates fully in the season: Sense and Sensibility I believe spends the most time there, but it is to advance the plots of romances begun in the country, and Emma is probably the only female lead with sufficient fortune to have been a part of the ton, yet she is the most firmly stuck in her home village. Continue reading »