Apr 122019
 

I have a special treat for you today, readers!  Meryton Press author, C. P. Odom is stopping in for a visit and chat about his newest release, Perilous Seige!  As you may have already learned, this new Pride and Prejudice variation includes an original character by the name of Major Edward McDunn. Colin has prepared a very lovely interview between Major McDunn and his granddaughter! We hope you enjoy!

Good morning, Meredith and thank you for hosting my character interview on your blog. It’s great to be here at Austenesque Reviews.

Today I am sharing an interview based on my latest release, Perilous Siege. I had a lot of fun writing this story and this interview takes readers behind the scenes for a more in-depth view of Edward McDunn, one of the leading characters in this story.

So let’s head back to 1864 for this exclusive interview…

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Date: November 20, 1864

Location: Pemberley vaults, Pemberley family estate, Derbyshire, Imperial Commonwealth of Great Britain

Note: The following is the second of a series of interviews conducted between Edward McDunn and Virginia Fitzwilliam. The in-depth interviews were ordered by Elizabeth Darcy, the director of Imperial Intelligence, to document the role played by her immediate family in the establishment of the Empire. While the outside world considered the Darcys, the McDunns, and the Fitzwilliams nothing more than significant figures among many from those early days, Mrs. Darcy had more information and had for long—among inner family circles only—referred to those six as “The Founders.” She believed it important to capture their special memories and opinions for posterity, though the interview records would be restricted to inner family members and maintained in the carefully guarded and newly constructed family vaults deep beneath Pemberley. Since she believed Major McDunn had played possibly the dominant role in those critical events, she deemed it especially critical to capture his recollections and opinions to the fullest extent possible. Accordingly, she assigned the task to one of her operatives who was also the granddaughter of McDunn. Mrs. Darcy believed Virginia Fitzwilliam might be able to elicit more information from the usually taciturn McDunn than would normally be the case. Continue reading »

Mar 182019
 

Happy Monday, everyone! I hope you all are enjoying a great week so far! I’m so excited to welcome Cass Grafton back to Austenesque Reviews today! She has been a long time friend of this blog and as you may have noticed we love her writing! Cass will be answering some questions about some news regarding her books, her writing, and lastly Bath. We hope you enjoy!!

So Cass, there have been some exciting developments happening with your stories these past few months. Can you share them with us?

Yes, of course, and thank you so much, Meredith, for giving me the chance to share the news with your lovely readers!

In September last year, the eBook rights to The Particular Charm of Miss Jane Austen (co-authored with my good friend, Ada Bright) were picked up by Canelo Digital Publishing.

Since The Particular Charm of Miss Jane Austen was already self-published by you and Ada Bright, how did it come about that it got picked up by a traditional publisher?

Continue reading »

Jan 062019
 

Hi friends!! I hope you are enjoying a great weekend! I am very excited to welcome back author Karen Cox to Austenesque Reviews today! Karen is gearing up to release an audiobook for her lovely Emma retelling –  I Could Write a Book. Which I read (and loved) last year! Karen is here today sharing a lovely interview between herself and her audiobook’s narrator – Emily Rahm! We hope you enjoy!! 

Hello gentle readers!

I’m so happy to be back here at Austenesque Reviews. Thanks for inviting me, Meredith!

I’m stopping by because I have some exciting news—an audiobook version of my 1970s Emma adaptation, titled I Could Write a Book, is available on the Amazon, Apple Books and Audible platforms!

I Could Write a Book tells the story of Emma Woodhouse—handsome, clever, and rich, as we all know, right? She’s the daughter of old money in Kentucky Bluegrass Horse Country, circa 1975. Emma considers herself a modern woman; she’s finishing her degree in psychology and taking care of her father’s health problems with grace and ease. She knows what’s right for everyone: her friend Tim Elton, who wants to be a politician; her beloved aunt, Nina Taylor; her brand new best friend, Mary Jo Smith; and even her oldest, bestest friend, George Knightley.

George, whose brother is married to Emma’s sister, has also been in and out of Emma’s life, even when they were kids. He went across the country to California for college, but he returned, attending law school in Kentucky and trying to fulfill his destiny—running the Knightley and Woodhouse law firm and managing the sprawling Donwell Horse Farms.

I loved writing the comedy of manners in the insular, mannerly community of Central Kentucky in the 70s. It’s the perfect story for an audiobook rendering, and that’s why I’m so thrilled to introduce you all today to Emily Rahm, I Could Write a Book ‘s narrator.

Emily and I sat down recently to discuss voice over work, how acting helps with story narrations, and why Emma ? It was so much fun to chat with her, so I wanted to share the conversation with all of you as well. Continue reading »