Oct 192018
 

What If Lydia Told Mr. Darcy Everyone Disliked Him?

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Source: Gift from Author

TYPE OF AUSTENESQUE NOVEL: Pride and Prejudice Variation

TIME FRAME: Begins during the Netherfield Ball

SYNOPSIS: Darcy learns – from the most startling of sources – what Elizabeth Bennet and the rest of Meryton truly think of him and it makes him realize how needlessly insulting his behavior and manners have been. He learns also that it isn’t just the people of Meryton that view him this way – Charles Bingley and his dear cousin, Richard Fitzwilliam have also commented on his officious and selfish tendencies. While taking the first steps to improving Elizabeth’s opinion of him and at the same time protecting the people of Meryton, Darcy receives some urgent and distressing news that immediately calls him home and requires him to reconfigure his plans for the next few months. What happens soon after that when Darcy and Elizabeth unexpectedly cross paths again in London? Could there be any love developing between these two or is it just compassion and friendly concern? Continue reading »

Oct 172018
 

Women of Sense, Strength, and Substance

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Editor

OVERVIEW:

With two brilliant and beautifully-crafted short-story anthologies – one devoted to Mr. Darcy and one all about Jane Austen’s bad boys – already under her belt, editor Christina Boyd has decided to create a collection that solely spotlights some of Jane Austen’s female characters. And instead of focusing on just one character, like Elizabeth Bennet, or the main heroine of each tale, this collection spotlights sixteen different female characters from various Jane Austen works. Some of the characters featured are well-known and beloved heroines like Anne Elliot and Marianne Dashwood, some are less favored heroines like Fanny Price and Emma Woodhouse, some are popular secondary characters such as Charlotte Lucas and Elinor Tilney, and some are more unexpected choices like Louisa Musgrove, Penelope Clay, and Lady Susan (love that Lady Susan is included!). But what unites all these characters (and their stories in this collection) is that they are women of sense (sometimes lately developed or hidden), strength (although they may doubt it at times) and undeniable substance.

“In Austen’s fictional world, a single woman in possession of good intellect, must be in want of a man who recognizes its value.” – Devoney Looser (Foreword to Rational Creatures) Continue reading »

Oct 122018
 

Happy Friday, friends! I am so excited to be kicking-off my weekend with a lovely visit from Victoria Kincaid! As you may already know, Victoria recently released a Pride and Prejudice variation titled When Jane Got Angry, which spotlights Jane Bennet and Mr. Bingley.  (Yay! You know I don’t mind seeing some Mr. Bingley!) In this premise Jane Bennet takes matters into her own hands while in London and seeks out Mr. Bingley. Attagirl, Jane! Today Victoria shares a little bit about her ideas for Mr. Bingley in this tale and an enticing excerpt from his point-of-view! We hope you enjoy!

Hi Meredith! Thank you so much for having me back as a guest! When I first started writing,
When Jane Got Angry, I was thinking about it as a book about…well, Jane Bennet getting angry. But I also wanted to write scenes from Bingley’s point of view. I realized that Bingley, of course, has his own reasons to be angry. And I knew that I needed to give him a chance to explore that anger so he could grow as a character in the same way that Jane does.

In some ways it was harder to have Bingley find his anger, in part because he bears some responsibility for his separation from Jane; he allowed himself to be persuaded to leave Hertfordshire while Jane suffers as a consequence of someone else’s decisions. But Bingley has also been deceived by his sisters and Darcy, so he experiences betrayal by the people closest to him. In P&P we are led to believe that Darcy confesses his deception and Bingley readily forgives him. Continue reading »