May 192017
 

One of The Best YA Jane Austen Adaptations I’ve Read!

Rating: 5 out 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

TYPE OF AUSTENESQUE NOVEL: Modern, Young Adult retelling of Mansfield Park

SETTING: Present-day Chicago

MAIN CHARACTERS:

  • Finley Price: A shy sixteen-year-old with a broken home life. Is very grateful for her godparents, the Bertrams, who have taken care of her these last two years.
  • Oliver Bertram: Eighteen-year-old second son of Finley’s godparents. Her closest friend and fiercest protector.
  • Harlan Crawford: Popular movie star who acts like an insincere and cocky jerk, but maybe there is more to him than meets the eye.

SYNOPSIS:

Even though she has spent the last two years with her godparents (a much better situation than with her mom), Finley still is finding it hard to stand up for herself and feel worthy. But there is one person who has always been there for her and sees her as more than worthy, her best friend, Oliver. Oliver is starting to feel something stronger than friendship for Finley, but he is afraid to act on it. Thinking it would betray Finley’s trust in him and take advantage of her situation. But what happens when two famous movie actors move in next door??? Continue reading »

Mar 242017
 

What If Fanny Was Tired of Being Called Ungrateful?

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

What a novel experience it is to read a variation for Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park! What happens in a Mansfield Park variation? Is it like a Pride and Prejudice variation – do Fanny and Edmund still end up together (just traveling a different path)? Or does the author shake things up a little more?

In Lona Manning’s contemplative and inventive variation she poses the questions:

  • What if “a contrary wind” delayed Sit Thomas’s return to Mansfield Park by a few weeks?
  • What if the rehearsals of Lover’s Vows continued unimpeded?
  • What if Fanny was tired of being told she was an ungrateful burden to the Bertram family and decided to take control of her own future?

Continue reading »

Mar 012017
 

GP

Hi readers!  I’m so excited to welcome author Kyra Kramer to Austenesque Reviews today! Kyra may be a brand new author to some of you because her lovely new release Mansfield Parsonage just came out last month!  It looks to be a very interesting story as it is a retelling of Mansfield Park from the perspective of bad-girl, Mary Crawford!  Kyra is sharing a little about what sets Mansfield Park a part a little from Jane Austen’s other novels and some excerpts from Mansfield Parsonage.  We hope you enjoy!

Beneath the Surface of Mansfield Park

Mansfield Park is one of Austen’s least-loved novels, but it is also the one with the deepest undercurrents swirling under its surface. From slavery to incest, the novel is discursive in a way most of her other works are not and this narrative morality shows up in places where you least expect it.

  1. It was anti-slavery.

The fact that Sir Thomas Bertram owns a plantation in Antigua, and therefore almost certainly owns slaves, could lead one to believe that Austen was not strongly pro-abolition. That supposition would be wrong, however … but her method of undercutting slave-ownership was much more apparent to her contemporary readers than her modern ones. A case in point is the fact that the newlywed Mr and Mrs Rushworth take a house in Wimpole Street. To the modern reader this means little, except to think they could afford a large house in London. To Austen’s audience, Wimpole Street was a byword for slave-owners’ vice. In my novel, Mansfield Parsonage, I try to make this connection clear again when Mary Crawford writes to Fanny Price that the Rushworth’s new home once belonged to Lady Lascelles: Continue reading »