Apr 212017
 

Mr. Darcy Seizes His Second Chance

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

TYPE OF AUSTENESQUE NOVEL: Pride and Prejudice Variation, Mature Audiences

TIME FRAME: Begins the day after the Netherfield Ball

SYNOPSIS: It’s the day after the Netherfield Ball and we all know what that means – Mr. Bingley has left Netherfield and Elizabeth is about to receive a very undesirable proposal from her cousin, Mr. Collins. Elizabeth is always quick to give Mr. Collins a firm ‘no’ to his proposal, but what is the one scenario where she would have to say ‘yes?’… After four years of an unhappy and emotionally abusive marriage, Elizabeth is set free by Mr. Collins’s thankfully early demise. And now that Elizabeth is once again free, there is a reserved and ardent suitor hoping to have his second chance. But the question is, does Elizabeth even want to be married again? Even if she falls in love? Continue reading »

Apr 192017
 

Hi readers!! I’m so excited to welcome back Sophie Turner to Austenesque Reviews today!  Sophie, is the lovely author behind the Constant Love series, a series of wonderful Pride and Prejudice sequels. But today Sophie is here to talk about her newest release, which is actually a variation!  Sophie has prepared a very special and thoughtful post about her characterization of Mr. Darcy.  We hope you enjoy!

Thank you so much for hosting me again here, Meredith! I always love visiting Austenesque Reviews, and I’m excited to tell readers more about the thoughts behind some of the characterizations in my latest book, Mistress: A Pride and Prejudice Variation, with Parts Not Suitable for Those Who Have Not Reached Their Majority.

I often look up words during my editing process to ensure that they’re actually period appropriate. Sometimes words that I would have thought were more modern surprise me and go back to the 14th or 15th century. Sometimes, I’m surprised to learn that words I would have thought in use during the Regency did not come in until much later.

One of the biggest surprises was “empathy.” which Merriam-Webster lists as having a first known use of 1909. This was a bit of a blow to me: ever since I’d learned the difference between sympathy and empathy, I’d always considered it important to distinguish between them, but now I had to use sympathy to encompass both.

But since we’re in the modern world and the word has been invented, it’s the concept of empathy I want to talk about, and how it applies to the two men who have the greatest influence over Elizabeth’s life in Mistress. I suppose I should say three men have a strong influence over her life, for it’s Mr. Bennet’s untimely death that first drives the plot.

The first of the two men I primarily want to talk about, though, is Mr. Collins, who times his proposal to Elizabeth after her father’s death in such a way that she cannot help but accept, for to do anything otherwise might force her family into genteel destitution. The timing is so bad that it shows a shocking lack of empathy, and yet it felt entirely in-character, for Collins. Continue reading »

Apr 102017
 

AE

Hello dear readers!  I am very excited to welcome back author Linda Beutler to Austenesque Reviews today! Linda’s first visit here was quite a few years back when she published her first Austenesque novel, The Red Chrysanthemum!  I’m so happy to have Linda here today to share an extra special exchange between Jane and Mr. Bingley (looks like she knows me well!) from her new release, My Mr. Darcy and Your Mr. Bingley!

Hi, Meredith! Thank you for hosting today’s stop on the blog tour for My Mr. Darcy and Your Mr. Bingley. I know the great affection you hold for Charles Bingley, and hope you will enjoy this tale of a Bingley who is just a bit more his own man. Just for you, and the readers at Austenesque Reviews, I include here an exchange of correspondence between Jane and Bingley not included in the story, but certainly easily imagined. If it were in the story, it would take place in Chapter 16, after Elizabeth and Darcy have met unexpectedly at the theatre. Jane and the Gardiners witness the awkwardness of this first “post-Hunsford” meeting, which does not go at all well! Continue reading »