May 162018
 

Mary Bennet Meets Victor Frankenstein

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Publisher

TYPE OF AUSTENESQUE NOVEL: Pride and Prejudice Sequel, Science Fiction

TIME FRAME: Begins 13 years after the close of Pride and Prejudice

MAIN CHARACTERS: Mary Bennet, Kitty Bennet, Victor Frankenstein, Henry Clerval, the Creature

SYNOPSIS:

A retelling of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and a continuation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice blended together as one. Pride and Prometheus picks up with the Bennet family (which consists of Mr. and Mrs. Bennet and their two unmarried daughters, Mary and Kitty) traveling to various locations such as Lyme and London. It appears Mrs. Bennet is still determined to marry off her remaining daughters! In London, Mary crosses paths with a brooding and brilliant young man by the name of Victor Frankenstein. Because of her own interest in natural sciences and the intellectual conversations they share, Mary finds herself drawn to Mr. Frankenstein. But what happens when she fully knows and understands the true extent of his work and mission…

SHAMEFUL CONFESSION: I’ve never read Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein! So I went into this read with only rough understanding of Frankenstein from plot synopses I read online. Continue reading »

Feb 262018
 

A Summer Sojourn to Northanger Abbey 20 Years Later

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Source:  Purchased

If you are a long-time reader of this blog, than you may have noticed that I am often drawn to older and rarer Austenesque sequels – ones that nowadays are out of print and only available through third party sellers. These stories that were published pre-1995 often focus on Jane Austen’s secondary and tertiary characters, avoid Jane Austen’s main heroes and heroines, and are more often sequels than variations.  Back before the great rise in self-publishing and JAFF popularity, these types of books were very little loved. Many Jane Austen fans were not impressed by other writers who dared to write about Jane Austen’s characters and in Jane Austen’s style. Since I love Jane Austen’s secondary characters and love hunting for rare books, I try to read any older Austenesque book I can find.

Jane Gillespie is the author of several sequels (which according to Amazon and Goodreads, appear to total 9). I’ve read four of her stories so far (but only reviewed one other on my blog). In Uninvited Guests she takes readers back to Northanger Abbey about twenty years after the close of Jane Austen’s tale. And while we don’t see Catherine or Henry, readers do see more of some other characters. I noticed that the full blurb is missing on Amazon, so I thought it would be helpful if I copied it here in my review: Continue reading »

Feb 142018
 

Hi readers!  I am happy to welcome author Don Jacobson to Austenesque Reviews today.  As you may have noticed, Mr. Jacobson has been hard at work publishing books in his The Bennet Wardrobe series.  So far, there are 5 works in total for this series that spotlight secondary characters from Pride and Prejudice and include a bit of time travel (sounds interesting, doesn’t it?).  I haven’t read any…yet, but I’ve heard a lot of great things from readers who have read this series.  Mr. Jacobson is currently celebrating the release of The Exile: The Countess Visits Longbourn and I am excited to have him here today to share more about the creation of this series and a colorful excerpt from The Exile: The Countess Visits LongbournWe hope you enjoy!

From Whence Came The Bennet Wardrobe?

Guest post by Don Jacobson

I have been deeply involved in reading JAFF since the latter part of 2013. Over the past three-plus years, I have probably read over 400 Pride and Prejudice/Regency variations. To say that I have immersed myself in the genre would be quite accurate.

In late 2014, I was going through a very difficult time as my 88-year-old mother began to fail. During that “last trip to see Mom,” my family had flown to Connecticut to attend her at the nursing home. She was in and out of reality. She knew who we were—at times—and who the kids were—at times. There were moments, though, when she would look at our 27-year old son and call him by my name.

My mother, as Kurt Vonnegut wrote, was unstuck in time.

And, I think that disturbed me on a subconscious level. Continue reading »