Sep 112017
 

An Incredibly Inventive Adventure

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

TYPE OF AUSTENESQUE NOVEL: Pride and Prejudice Variation (Alternate History)

SETTING: 1811, England (under French rule)

SYNOPSIS: Six years ago Napoleon invaded England. Bringing in his militia, enforcing fees to pay for the war, stripping titles from the aristocracy, and seizing homes and properties of the wealthy Napoleon now has England completely in its power. But curiously enough Mr. Darcy of Pemberley still has his land and appears to be cooperating with the French. A situation that has lost him some friends and their respect. But is he really a traitor? What reason could Mr. Darcy have for consorting with the enemy? Continue reading »

Sep 082017
 

Hi friends!  I am so happy to welcome author Maria Grace to Austenesque Reviews today!  As some of you know Maria has been dealing with Hurricane Harvey these past few weeks and it is amazing that she released her new book, A Less Agreeable Man at the same time!  Major applause to Maria for that – she is Wonder Woman with capital W!  Anyways, I am thrilled to share Maria’s post about secondary characters and a very beleaguered Colonel Fitwilliam!!

Writing Secondary Characters

Jane Austen gave us some amazingly memorable characters throughout all her books, characters we cannot get enough of. Darcy and Elizabeth make the most frequent appearance in adaptations of Austen for very good reason. But there’s something about the secondary characters that I find very compelling, as well.

A Less Agreeable Man is the fourth book I’ve written around secondary characters, and I’ve done almost as many short stories. There are just so many wonderful possibilities with these characters they are hard to resist.

Don’t get me wrong, they can be pretty challenging as well. Some of them show up as either bland or ridiculous in Austen’s works, unraveling the puzzle of what makes them so is a fascinating process that can result in a surprising, three dimensional character.

Lydia Bennet is a ridiculous, self-centered little flirt. Mary Bennet is bland and sermonizing. Harriet Smith (of Emma) is a ditzy little follower who does not think for herself. Elizabeth Elliot—or where to begin with that piece of work! The list goes on. But the delicious question is why are they that way? Is it possible that we have been presented with an unreliable narrator and only see them through the eyes of that opinion? What is going on underneath the surface of that character? Continue reading »

Sep 042017
 

Snark and Drama!

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Source: Purchased

Jasmin Field knows she is no actor; she is a journalist for a woman’s magazine. But on a lark she decides to tag along with her sister (who is an actress) to an audition for a fundraising adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.  But just before her audition she overhears the play’s director – the great and famous actor, Harry Noble – refer to her as an “Ugly Sister.” In response, Jazz (as she is known to her friends) gives him a rendition of Elizabeth Bennet refusing Mr. Darcy’s first proposal that perfectly embodies her very real emotions of disbelief, contempt, and abject fury.

As you might guess, Jazz, even with her nonexistent acting experience, lands the role of Lizzy Bennet in the play. And during her rehearsals and encounters with Harry Noble, her opinion of the arrogant and exacting director sink further and further. Especially when she learns that he prevented fellow actor William Whitby from making it big in Hollywood and discovers that he convinced another actor to focus on his career and not his relationship with her sister. Could she despise this loathsome man any more?!? Just when she thinks the answer is no, Harry tells Jazz what he really thinks of her… Continue reading »