Jan 152018
 

A Treasured Tour of Pemberley

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

Remember when Elizabeth and the Gardiners tour Pemberley in Pride and Prejudice? Wouldn’t it have been lovely to embark on such a tour with them? To experience firsthand the extensive and beauteous grounds and walk near the fine picturesque woods…it would really be something…wouldn’t it? Well, to the delight of us many Pemberley-lovers the opportunity for a virtual tour of Pemberley now exists! Thanks to J.B. Grantham, readers can enjoy the splendors and graceful serenity of Pemberley through the words of its master, Fitzwilliam Darcy. Enhancing Mr. Darcy’s guided tour are the captivating and exquisite watercolors and drawings done by the talented hands of Mr. Darcy’s wife and sister.   Continue reading »

Jan 122018
 

What If Mr. Collins Was Incredibly Handsome?

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Publisher

In A Most Handsome Gentleman, author Suzan Lauder shines a spotlight of the boorish and ridiculous Mr. Collins…and by “shines a spotlight” I mean she gives him an incredible make over…and now he is gorgeous (ahem. On the outside.) With his tall height, broad shoulders, perfect physique, appealing features, and graceful comportment, Mr. Collins’s physical attributes are more arresting than any other male characters’ in Pride and Prejudice. And doesn’t he know it! Mr. Collins was full of pompous conceit before, but now since he über attractive he acts like he is God’s gift to humanity. *rolls eyes*

While the whole of Meryton and Elizabeth’s family are entranced by Mr. Collins’ startling and alluring good looks, the charm of his outward beauty begins to fade on Elizabeth Bennet as she hears more and more of the arrogant and narcissistic nonsense he spouts. His elevated opinions of himself, his social standing, and his prospects, leads Mr. Collins to stubbornly insist on pursuing his settled choice of Jane Bennet as his future bride, even after Mrs. Bennet gentle tries to divert his attentions elsewhere. What will Mr. Bingley say? Continue reading »

Dec 262017
 

Hello, dear readers! I hope all of you who celebrate enjoyed a very Happy Christmas!  Mr. Bingley and I had a lovely holiday break so far – lots of time together, and we enjoyed spending the whole of yesterday with my family! Here is a little after-Christmas treat for you – a lovely guest post from Victoria Kincaid!!  I absolutely adored Ms. Kincaid’s Christmas novella A Very Darcy Christmas last year.  I can’t wait to read her newest release – Christmas at Darcy House.  Victoria is here to share a little about the tradition of mistletoe and an excerpt from Christmas at Darcy House!! 

Thank you for hosting me, Meredith! Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to you and all your readers.

While some Regency Christmas traditions are familiar to us, many of them are not ones we practice today. Few people try to keep a Yule log burning all night, for example. However, one tradition that has survived is mistletoe, although today’s version is likely to be artificial.

The practice of gathering mistletoe began in the second century BC in ancient Britain, when the Druids saw it as a symbol of good fortune and fertility. But mistletoe did not come to be associated with kissing until the 18th century. Balls of mistletoe, tied with ribbon, would be hung in doorways and from ceilings. An unmarried woman could not refuse a kiss if she was underneath the mistletoe.

With every kiss, a man would pluck one of the mistletoe berries, and when there were no more berries, the ball was retired for the year. The superstition was that women who were never kissed could not expect to get married in the coming year. Mistletoe was not readily available in every part of England, so people would frequently send it to relatives or friends in parts of the country where it did not grow. Continue reading »