May 162018
 

Mary Bennet Meets Victor Frankenstein

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Publisher

TYPE OF AUSTENESQUE NOVEL: Pride and Prejudice Sequel, Science Fiction

TIME FRAME: Begins 13 years after the close of Pride and Prejudice

MAIN CHARACTERS: Mary Bennet, Kitty Bennet, Victor Frankenstein, Henry Clerval, the Creature

SYNOPSIS:

A retelling of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and a continuation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice blended together as one. Pride and Prometheus picks up with the Bennet family (which consists of Mr. and Mrs. Bennet and their two unmarried daughters, Mary and Kitty) traveling to various locations such as Lyme and London. It appears Mrs. Bennet is still determined to marry off her remaining daughters! In London, Mary crosses paths with a brooding and brilliant young man by the name of Victor Frankenstein. Because of her own interest in natural sciences and the intellectual conversations they share, Mary finds herself drawn to Mr. Frankenstein. But what happens when she fully knows and understands the true extent of his work and mission…

SHAMEFUL CONFESSION: I’ve never read Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein! So I went into this read with only rough understanding of Frankenstein from plot synopses I read online. Continue reading »

Mar 192018
 

Hi friends! Not too long ago I interviewed the lovely Riana Everly as she was celebrating her debut release, Teaching Eliza! Today Riana has kindly stopped by again for a visit as she is yet again celebrating another book release – The Assistant.  I’m so excited to learn more about this tale as it centers upon the Gardiners!!  I hope you enjoy this lovely post Riana put together!

Edward Gardiner – who is he, and how did he become the man he is?

Thank you, Meredith, for hosting me today. I am particularly thrilled to stop by Austenesque Reviews today, because this is the release day for my new novel, The Assistant: Before Pride and Prejudice. (Insert huge grin here!)

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I love all the Lizzy and Darcy stories —who doesn’t, after all—but I also love the stories that feature other members of the extended Bennet family and their friends. I have read some lovely continuations, or variations that focus on Lizzy’s sisters or her friend Charlotte. There are also stories that recount life in the Darcy household after the couple marry, and I’ve read some wonderful tales that propose some alternate histories for Mr. Bennet and his two eldest daughters. What there is not a lot of, however, is JAFF about Lizzy’s favourite aunt and uncle. I can only think of one other such offering: The Courtship of Edward Gardiner, by the amazingly talented Nicole Clarkston. (As a disclaimer, I first wrote The Assistant before she published her novel, so any similarities between these tales are purely coincidental!)

Well, as the saying goes, Edward Gardiner needs some love! In Pride and Prejudice, although Caroline Bingley disparages the Bennets’ London relations as “such low connections, when Mr. Darcy sees them at Pemberley, Elizabeth notes that “he takes them now for people of fashion,” and is relieved that “she had some relations for whom there was no need to blush.” She goes on to listen to her uncle, whose every sentence “marked his intelligence, his taste, or his good manners.” Continue reading »

Feb 262018
 

A Summer Sojourn to Northanger Abbey 20 Years Later

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Source:  Purchased

If you are a long-time reader of this blog, than you may have noticed that I am often drawn to older and rarer Austenesque sequels – ones that nowadays are out of print and only available through third party sellers. These stories that were published pre-1995 often focus on Jane Austen’s secondary and tertiary characters, avoid Jane Austen’s main heroes and heroines, and are more often sequels than variations.  Back before the great rise in self-publishing and JAFF popularity, these types of books were very little loved. Many Jane Austen fans were not impressed by other writers who dared to write about Jane Austen’s characters and in Jane Austen’s style. Since I love Jane Austen’s secondary characters and love hunting for rare books, I try to read any older Austenesque book I can find.

Jane Gillespie is the author of several sequels (which according to Amazon and Goodreads, appear to total 9). I’ve read four of her stories so far (but only reviewed one other on my blog). In Uninvited Guests she takes readers back to Northanger Abbey about twenty years after the close of Jane Austen’s tale. And while we don’t see Catherine or Henry, readers do see more of some other characters. I noticed that the full blurb is missing on Amazon, so I thought it would be helpful if I copied it here in my review: Continue reading »