Mar 032017
 

AA

Hello Austenesque Friends!

I hope you are doing well!  Did you have a lovely February?  My February felt too busy and too fast!  Between my music studio growing and keeping my days filled and Mr. Bingley traveling a lot of the weekends, we felt like the month was a bit of a blur!

Although while Mr. Bingley was out of town, I did get enjoy some great reading time.  So I guess that is a good achievement for the month. 🙂

Also….we got new couches!!!  And all we want to do is sit in them, recline in them, and cuddle!!!

Even more than before, we’ve become obsessed with staying home!! 😉 Total hobbit mode!

How about you?   What has been keeping you busy? 🙂

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Want to know what Austenesque fun I’m getting into this month?

…here is what’s on this month’s

Austenesque Agenda:

~ TO REVIEW ~

  Continue reading »

Mar 012017
 

GP

Hi readers!  I’m so excited to welcome author Kyra Kramer to Austenesque Reviews today! Kyra may be a brand new author to some of you because her lovely new release Mansfield Parsonage just came out last month!  It looks to be a very interesting story as it is a retelling of Mansfield Park from the perspective of bad-girl, Mary Crawford!  Kyra is sharing a little about what sets Mansfield Park a part a little from Jane Austen’s other novels and some excerpts from Mansfield Parsonage.  We hope you enjoy!

Beneath the Surface of Mansfield Park

Mansfield Park is one of Austen’s least-loved novels, but it is also the one with the deepest undercurrents swirling under its surface. From slavery to incest, the novel is discursive in a way most of her other works are not and this narrative morality shows up in places where you least expect it.

  1. It was anti-slavery.

The fact that Sir Thomas Bertram owns a plantation in Antigua, and therefore almost certainly owns slaves, could lead one to believe that Austen was not strongly pro-abolition. That supposition would be wrong, however … but her method of undercutting slave-ownership was much more apparent to her contemporary readers than her modern ones. A case in point is the fact that the newlywed Mr and Mrs Rushworth take a house in Wimpole Street. To the modern reader this means little, except to think they could afford a large house in London. To Austen’s audience, Wimpole Street was a byword for slave-owners’ vice. In my novel, Mansfield Parsonage, I try to make this connection clear again when Mary Crawford writes to Fanny Price that the Rushworth’s new home once belonged to Lady Lascelles: Continue reading »