May 202018
 

Hi dear friends! I’m so excited to take part in this special announcement today as it is about one of my favorite books by Karen Cox!!!  I’ve loved everything I’ve read by Karen Cox, but I especially adored her poignant and expressive love story, At the Edge of the Sea when I first read it 5 years ago!  Today, Karen has a very exciting announcement about this lovely work!!

From the Author

Thank you so much for letting me visit with you and your readers today! I’m really excited about the upcoming summer release of Son of a Preacher Man. It’s a special book for me, an original story inspired by Pride and Prejudice, that was originally published as At the Edge of the Sea in 2013. For its five-year birthday, I’ve re-edited it, given back its original title, Son of a Preacher Man, and with the help of Shari Ryan, of Madhat Covers, and Joshua Hollis, who created the image, I’ve given it a new cover too.

~ Book Description ~

“I forget that you’re a fella sometimes.”

“Gee, thanks.”

I never forgot that she was a girl. Not for one second…

1959. The long, hot Southern summer bakes the sleepy town of Orchard Hill. Billy Ray Davenport, an aspiring physician and only son of an indomitable traveling minister, is a young man with a plan that starts with working in a small-town doctor’s office before he begins medical school in the fall. Handsome, principled, and keenly observant, he arrives in town to lodge with the Millers, the local doctor’s family. He never bargained for Lizzie Quinlan—a complex, kindred spirit who is beautiful and compassionate, yet scorned by the townsfolk. Could a girl with a reputation be different than she seems? With her quirky wisdom and a spine of steel hidden beneath an effortless sensuality, Lizzie is about to change Billy Ray’s life—and his heart—forever.

A realistic look at first love, told by an idealistic young man, Son of a Preacher Man is a heartwarming coming of age tale set in a simpler time.

~ Expected release date July 1st! ~

And without further ado….here is the big reveal!!!

Continue reading »

Sep 152017
 

A Thoughtful and Reverent Retelling of Emma

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

While she may be “handsome, clever, and rich,” Emma Woodhouse finds herself living a life not entirely of her own choosing. In 1973 she left the university that was her mother’s alma mater to come home and live with and care for her father who suffered from a debilitating stroke. And even though she is soon to be graduating, she doesn’t have the ability to up and go live a new city or begin a full-time career. But Emma isn’t one to complain. Her family is her world and she would happily sacrifice her freedom to take care of them and be what they need – no questions about it! However, sometimes, Emma cannot help but feel a little envious towards those that are able to lead a different life – whether it be moving away from their hometown, having a noble profession, or just following their dreams…

Even though Emma keeps herself pretty busy with her course work, managing her father’s house, and tending to her father’s care, she has time to lend assistance and guidance to those in her circle of dear friends and family. She touts herself as a “born matchmaker,” but as Emma will soon learn the game of love is often more complex and risky than it seems… Continue reading »

Aug 282017
 

Hi friends!  I hope your Mondays are off to a great start!  As you might already beware, the talented, award-winning author Karen Cox has a new book about to release and it is a retelling of Jane Austen’s Emma!  I can’t tell you how excited I am about this – I love Emma, I love Mr. Knightley, and I love Karen Cox’s writing!  Karen has prepared IMHO an amazingly insightful and astute post about Emma Woodhouse.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

Emma Woodhouse: Jane Austen’s gift to you, the modern woman.

At first glance, it seems impossible that a 200-year-old character from Regency England could speak to me, a modern-day reader, but Jane Austen’s Emma Woodhouse is, in my opinion, a heroine for modern times.

A lot of readers aren’t too thrilled with Emma, and it’s easy to see why. It’s all about her (except it really isn’t—more on that later.) For heaven’s sake, even the novel itself is named after her! From the first phrase of the book, we are primed to envy her when we learn she is “handsome, clever, and rich.” She’s the kind of heroine that sparks a reader’s resentment—for what she has and for the blessings conferred on her by birth and good genes, through no effort of her own. In the little town of Highbury and on her estate, Hartfield, she is privileged with a capital P.

And then there’s her behavior during the novel. A gentleman’s daughter with a limited view of the world, she comes off as vain about her own intelligence and her dubious importance. She’s nosey. She’s a snob. She’s wrong-headed, self-deluding, and headstrong. No wonder Austen called her “a heroine whom no one but myself will much like.” Continue reading »