Dec 062017
 

GP

Hi friends!  I’m always so happy when authors come and pay a visit to Austenesque Reviews, especially when they are new authors!  🙂  Today I am very happy to have author Andreea Catana as my guest!  Her new Pride and Prejudice variation Meant to Be was just released recently, and I love the sound of it because Darcy and Elizabeth meet for the first time at Rosings rather than at Meryton!  I can’t wait to see how that changes their story! 😉  Andreea is here to share her first encounter with and impressions of Jane Austen.  We hope you enjoy!

I have met Jane Austen and I have written a book. It’s called Meant to Be.

Yes, I have met Jane Austen.

Of course, not in my lifetime, nor in hers, – for such travels are for the moment impossible – but I can confidently say that we have met. I shall try in the course of a few pages to tell you how I have known her and what she has thought me.

I made Jane Austen’s acquaintance when I was ten and she was already famous for more than a hundred years. My mom adored her (and her books) and naturally thought that I might like her as well.

However, my first impression of Jane Austen, which I got from the picture at the end of the book, was that she seemed like a lady who was a little bit too severe, like a scolding aunt that never allows you to play at will or expects you to behave a certain proper way. And since my reading interest had been up to that moment mostly stories about the wild Indian jungles and about inspiring, yet melodramatic Victorian orphans, I was a little bit cautious that I might enjoy the story my mother presented to me. Pride and Prejudice The very title sounded mature for me, with some concepts I did not fully comprehend.

But I opened the book and there it was, the most famous sentence in literary history:

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”  Continue reading »

Dec 042017
 

AA

Hi friends!  I hope your December has gotten off to a lovely start!  Did you have a busy November?  We did!  It felt like a very full month!  One of our highlights of the past month were taking a mini-trip to Massachusetts to see extended family for a long weekend!

Continue reading »

Dec 032017
 

Hi readers! I am very excited to welcome Audrey Ryan, author of a recently released modern-day adaptation of Pride and Prejudice titled, All the Things I Know, to Austenesque Reviews today! All the Things I Know is Ms. Ryan’s debut release with Meryton Press and this post begins her blog tour! Today Audrey visits Austenesque Reviews to chat with you all about writing, her new release, and Jane Austen!

Welcome, Audrey! Thank you so much for visiting my blog! Since you are a new author to me and some of my readers, how about we start off with you telling us a little bit about yourself. How long have you been writing? When did you first encounter Jane Austen?

Thank you for the warm welcome — I’m very excited to start off my blog tour at Austenesque Reviews! I’ve been writing since I learned how to put pen to page. I’ve always loved telling stories. When I was a kid, one of my favorite things to do was make little story books and as I grew older, I kept writing short stories. I was an English major in college and took the writing track. I had thought I could be like J.K. Rowling or Stephen King and live off my novels, but I never actually finished any of the novels I started till now!

I first learned about Jane Austen when the 1995 P&P came out and all the older ladies in my life swooned over Colin Firth. I didn’t actually read Austen till I was in college, but I didn’t grow to love Austen till after. I lost my mom suddenly when I was 24. A few months later, my family took a roadtrip down to Los Angeles to see my dad’s family. We were hanging out with my great aunt and uncle, who were big readers, and my great aunt Naomi mentioned that whenever she felt like she needed cheering up, she would re-read Pride & Prejudice. When we got home, I took her advice. This also led me to read or re-read all of Austen’s novels. It was a great source of comfort. Continue reading »