Sep 202017
 

Hi my lovely reader friends!  I am very excited to welcome Sharon Lathan to Austenesque Reviews today!  Sharon is one Austenesque author who doesn’t need an introduction, with so many celebrated Austenesque works to her name!  I personally am very excited about Sharon’s new release, Darcy and Elizabeth: Hope of the Futurebecause it completes her Darcy Saga Prequel Duo, which I have not read yet, but hope to soon!  We hope you enjoy Sharon’s post about one of the most important features of any wedding day (no matter the time period!) – the wedding dress!

My sincerest thanks to Meredith for hosting me on Austenesque Reviews today. It is an honor to be here, and a great pleasure to share a bit of my research with your readers, as well as my latest novel. Darcy and Elizabeth: Hope of the Future is the second book in the two-volume Darcy Saga Prequel Duo, which began with Darcy and Elizabeth: A Season of Courtship. These two novels perfectly fit with my Darcy Saga Sequel to Pride and Prejudice, the series now including nine lengthy novels and one novella.

With the theme of the Prequel Duo focusing on wedding preparation for our two loving couples, a thought a bit of history about the wedding gowns would be appropriate. Here we go!

Regency Era Wedding Gowns

The vast majority of our modern-day wedding extravagances emerge during the Victorian era, including the bridal ensemble. The generally understated and simplistic decades surrounding the Regency meant that wedding gowns were similarly modest and unassuming. Of course, when it comes to a lady’s special day, females in every culture and time period fret over their appearance and desire a beautiful dress. Continue reading »

Aug 282017
 

Hi friends!  I hope your Mondays are off to a great start!  As you might already beware, the talented, award-winning author Karen Cox has a new book about to release and it is a retelling of Jane Austen’s Emma!  I can’t tell you how excited I am about this – I love Emma, I love Mr. Knightley, and I love Karen Cox’s writing!  Karen has prepared IMHO an amazingly insightful and astute post about Emma Woodhouse.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

Emma Woodhouse: Jane Austen’s gift to you, the modern woman.

At first glance, it seems impossible that a 200-year-old character from Regency England could speak to me, a modern-day reader, but Jane Austen’s Emma Woodhouse is, in my opinion, a heroine for modern times.

A lot of readers aren’t too thrilled with Emma, and it’s easy to see why. It’s all about her (except it really isn’t—more on that later.) For heaven’s sake, even the novel itself is named after her! From the first phrase of the book, we are primed to envy her when we learn she is “handsome, clever, and rich.” She’s the kind of heroine that sparks a reader’s resentment—for what she has and for the blessings conferred on her by birth and good genes, through no effort of her own. In the little town of Highbury and on her estate, Hartfield, she is privileged with a capital P.

And then there’s her behavior during the novel. A gentleman’s daughter with a limited view of the world, she comes off as vain about her own intelligence and her dubious importance. She’s nosey. She’s a snob. She’s wrong-headed, self-deluding, and headstrong. No wonder Austen called her “a heroine whom no one but myself will much like.” Continue reading »

Aug 142017
 

Hi friends!  I’ve been waiting for this day for a long time and I’m so happy it is here!  Today I am welcoming one of the kindest and most genuine people in the Jane Austen community to Austenesque Reviews – author J. Dawn King!  Not only is Joy a wonderfully kind and supportive writer – she is an extremely busy one!  I am forever 3 books behind her! #NotComplaining.  I am so happy Joy is paying us a visit today to talk about writing Austenesque stories in alternate settings!  One of my favorite kinds of Austenesque stories!

Joy: Hello, Meredith! Thank you for inviting me to Netherfield. You have a lovely home. Is that cake for us?

Meredith: Yes, Joy, later. You mentioned when you called that you had something to ask me. Please feel free to do so at once.

Joy: Thank you, dear friend. (head bowed) Might I be seated?

Meredith: Absolutely! This sounds serious.

Joy: Oh, dear. I am sorry if I have worried you. But, indeed, yes. This is very serious. Continue reading »