May 292017
 

Happy Memorial Day, readers! Today, Austenesque Reviews is paid a visit from an author who may be new to some of you – Sara Marks, who just recently published a Persuasion modern-day retelling titled Modern Persuasion!  A new release that I’m looking forward to reading soon!  While chatting with Sara through emails, we discovered that we are both fond of making lists!  Since Sara is a list-maker, I asked if she would make one for dear Anne! 🙂  We hope you enjoy!

Top 10 Things I Love About Anne Elliot

1. Anne is not your typical middle child.  Instead of trying to grab any attention she can, she is thoughtful and measured.  I always felt she was more like the eldest child, Mary the middle child, and Elizabeth the spoiled youngest.

2. She sees and judges people on what she can observe about them, not on their status in society.

3. She loves Mary and tries to give her sister the attention she thinks Mary craves.

4. She sees Lady Russell as the next best thing to her mother, recognizing that sometimes you need a parent (especially when your living one refuses to act the role).

Continue reading »

Apr 192017
 

Hi readers!! I’m so excited to welcome back Sophie Turner to Austenesque Reviews today!  Sophie, is the lovely author behind the Constant Love series, a series of wonderful Pride and Prejudice sequels. But today Sophie is here to talk about her newest release, which is actually a variation!  Sophie has prepared a very special and thoughtful post about her characterization of Mr. Darcy.  We hope you enjoy!

Thank you so much for hosting me again here, Meredith! I always love visiting Austenesque Reviews, and I’m excited to tell readers more about the thoughts behind some of the characterizations in my latest book, Mistress: A Pride and Prejudice Variation, with Parts Not Suitable for Those Who Have Not Reached Their Majority.

I often look up words during my editing process to ensure that they’re actually period appropriate. Sometimes words that I would have thought were more modern surprise me and go back to the 14th or 15th century. Sometimes, I’m surprised to learn that words I would have thought in use during the Regency did not come in until much later.

One of the biggest surprises was “empathy.” which Merriam-Webster lists as having a first known use of 1909. This was a bit of a blow to me: ever since I’d learned the difference between sympathy and empathy, I’d always considered it important to distinguish between them, but now I had to use sympathy to encompass both.

But since we’re in the modern world and the word has been invented, it’s the concept of empathy I want to talk about, and how it applies to the two men who have the greatest influence over Elizabeth’s life in Mistress. I suppose I should say three men have a strong influence over her life, for it’s Mr. Bennet’s untimely death that first drives the plot.

The first of the two men I primarily want to talk about, though, is Mr. Collins, who times his proposal to Elizabeth after her father’s death in such a way that she cannot help but accept, for to do anything otherwise might force her family into genteel destitution. The timing is so bad that it shows a shocking lack of empathy, and yet it felt entirely in-character, for Collins. Continue reading »

Mar 202017
 

Happy Monday, readers! Today, Austenesque Reviews is paid a visit from an author who may be new to some of you – Sue Barr, who just recently published a Pride and Prejudice sequel about Caroline Bingley, titled Caroline, Pride & Prejudice Continued… Book One!  I hope you enjoy meeting Sue and this wonderfully fun post she put together!

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Good morning, Meredith, and thank you for hosting this post for my latest release, Caroline, Pride & Prejudice Continued… Book One. Today, I am sharing a post that I hope gives your readers some laughs and allows them to get to know Caroline and her new love interest, Nathan, a little better.

I have invited Emma Woodhouse to host our Newlywed Game, 1812-style, and without further ado, I will turn the floor over to Emma… Continue reading »