Jan 122015
 

Lizzy and JaneA Literary Feast of Emotions!

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Source:  Review Copy form Publisher

Lizzy – a thirty-three-year-old gifted New York City chef who seems to have temporarily lost her magic in the kitchen. Her restaurant isn’t packed, her dishes aren’t as focused and vibrant, and her financial backer thinks she is distracted by events in her personal life.

Jane – Lizzy’s older sister. A mother of two, who, at the age of forty-one, is battling the very terrifying and unpredictable disease known as cancer. While Jane’s cancer isn’t aggressive and was diagnosed at an early stage it has created a vast amount of tension and upheaval to every aspect of her life.

Lizzy and Jane – sisters who lost their mother to cancer fifteen years ago and still have emotional scars that have not yet healed. Jane left home at eighteen and never came to visit while their mom was sick. Lizzy, feeling abandoned by her sister, left home as well and the two now have a very distant and cold relationship full of unresolved issues and pain. But due to the situations in both their lives they are brought together for an extended visit… Continue reading »

Jun 062014
 

Dear Mr. KnightleyLearning to Live Outside Her Novels

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Author

When Samantha Moore was twenty-two and a recent graduate from Roosevelt College she was offered a full-expense-paid grant and scholarship to earn her master’s degree at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. Samantha declined this generous offer because she didn’t want to continue living at Grace House, a foster organization which she has called home for the last seven years. Instead Samantha opted for the career path and tried to earn her own way in the world. Ten months later finds Samantha, jobless, homeless, and back at Grace House asking if the generous grant to study journalism is still available.

Fortunately for Samantha, it is! But there is just one stipulation – she must regularly report via handwritten letters to the foundation’s director, updating him on her progress and “things that matter.” These letters are to be journal entries that she sends to a P.O. box, and addresses to a pseudonym, Mr. Knightley. Samantha happily accepts this contingency and begins to pen one-sided letters to an unknown, unseen, yet magnanimous Mr. Knightley. Continue reading »