Feb 022018
 

6 Sweet Stories Filled with Heart, Humor, and Happily Ever Afters!

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Source: Review Copy from Authors

The sensational and celebratory Holidays with Jane series would not be complete without an anthology about Valentine’s Day – a holiday that celebrates romantic love and affection! As with each of the previous collections, there are six short stories in this anthology (one for each Jane Austen novel) and each story takes place in present-day. With the assistance of cupid, fate, and other forces six couples find love on Valentine’s Day this year…

I hope you find this breakdown helpful!

DESIGN BY CHANCE – Rebecca M. Fleming

  • The Premise: While hired by the Crofts to renovate her childhood home into an art gallery, Gracie Elliot gets roped into planning a Valentine’s Gala that features her ex-fiancé and now-famous ring designer, Derek Worth…
  • What I Loved: How Derek and Gracie both had artsy/creative professions and how they met during college. I also enjoyed how Ms. Fleming cleverly tied in some characters from her previous stories and Derek’s sentimental and sweet declaration at the end.

Continue reading »

Jan 292018
 

Hi readers!  Who would like to take a short trip to Vegas today?  Perhaps in the company of a  modern-day Darcy and Elizabeth?  Sounds so fun, right?  I think so!  I’ve never been to Vegas, but I think it would be a fun place to see and visit.  Well, it looks like we can virtually travel to Vegas in Amy George’s latest release, The Sweetest Ruin!  The lovely Amy George is currently on tour for this new release, and she is visiting today to talk about the similarities between Jane Austen’s Gretna Green and Las Vegas! We hope you enjoy!

Gretna to Vegas

Good morning, Meredith, and thank you for hosting me at Austenesque Reviews for the launch of the blog tour for my newest release, “The Sweetest Ruin.” This story is a bit different from my first published story, Second Impressions, because it’s a modernization of Pride & Prejudice that has Darcy and Elizabeth initially meeting one another in Las Vegas, Nevada. I think that when JAFF readers hear the words Las Vegas as the setting of a JAFF story, their minds might also go to another place we dearly love to read about in JAFF; the scandalously romantic setting of Gretna Green in Scotland.

I thought it would be fun to share this post with your readers to draw some connections for them between these two settings as we launch the blog tour for “The Sweetest Ruin. Continue reading »

Dec 262017
 

Hello, dear readers! I hope all of you who celebrate enjoyed a very Happy Christmas!  Mr. Bingley and I had a lovely holiday break so far – lots of time together, and we enjoyed spending the whole of yesterday with my family! Here is a little after-Christmas treat for you – a lovely guest post from Victoria Kincaid!!  I absolutely adored Ms. Kincaid’s Christmas novella A Very Darcy Christmas last year.  I can’t wait to read her newest release – Christmas at Darcy House.  Victoria is here to share a little about the tradition of mistletoe and an excerpt from Christmas at Darcy House!! 

Thank you for hosting me, Meredith! Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to you and all your readers.

While some Regency Christmas traditions are familiar to us, many of them are not ones we practice today. Few people try to keep a Yule log burning all night, for example. However, one tradition that has survived is mistletoe, although today’s version is likely to be artificial.

The practice of gathering mistletoe began in the second century BC in ancient Britain, when the Druids saw it as a symbol of good fortune and fertility. But mistletoe did not come to be associated with kissing until the 18th century. Balls of mistletoe, tied with ribbon, would be hung in doorways and from ceilings. An unmarried woman could not refuse a kiss if she was underneath the mistletoe.

With every kiss, a man would pluck one of the mistletoe berries, and when there were no more berries, the ball was retired for the year. The superstition was that women who were never kissed could not expect to get married in the coming year. Mistletoe was not readily available in every part of England, so people would frequently send it to relatives or friends in parts of the country where it did not grow. Continue reading »