Jun 062018
 

Hi readers! I am very excited to welcome author Victoria Grossack and narrator Erin Evans-Walker to Austenesque Reviews today! As you may already know Victoria Grossack has published two Austen-inspired mysteries – The Highbury Murders and The Meryton Murders. Not too long ago The Meryton Murders was released on Audible audiobook with Erin Evans-Walker as the narrator. I know many of you who love audiobooks are probably happy to hear that! Today both ladies stop by to chat about audio books, The Meryton Murders, and Jane Austen!  We hope you enjoy!

Erin, how long have you been producing audio books?

I started production of my first one, a fantasy novel called Holding the Heavens, in early 2017. I’m up to three released volumes with a fourth nearing completion.

Victoria, what made you decide to do an Audible recording of The Meryton Murders?

One reader of The Meryton Murders in the Kindle edition who reviewed the book very favorably requested that I arrange an Audible recording. I had never explored this seriously before, because paying for this upfront is expensive – and since I didn’t know what I was doing, I didn’t feel qualified to hire or supervise anyone. The process is expensive for a good reason – the narrator has to have the talent to read and act and have the technical knowledge to make a recording that meets all of Audible’s requirements.

But Audible now has a creation exchange to match authors and narrators (called producers), where they agree to share royalties. This means that your producer has a vested interest in making sure everything is done right – and of course producers will only apply for projects they consider worthy. So I figured out how to sign up, put out a request for auditions – I wanted a British female voice – and within three hours Erin applied! Continue reading »

Jun 022018
 

Hi readers! I’m so happy to welcome back the lovely Caitlin Williams to Austenesque Reviews today! As I am sure you are already aware, Caitlin has just released her latest book, The Events at Branxbourne! I’m super excited about this for two reasons: I’m a big fan of Caitlin Williams (loved, loved, loved The Coming of Age of Miss Elizabeth Bennet!) and I’ve been hearing some terrific things about this newest release (some friends have been praising it REAL hard!) 😉 And I know they aren’t doing that without reason!!!

Thanks for hosting me, Meredith, for the launch of the blog tour for my newest book, The Events at Branxbourne. I’d thought I’d share a wee snippet from the book with your readers. I also want to thank everyone who has already bought a copy of this book for their support.  I really hope they enjoy the story.

I should explain that in this scene Darcy is visiting his cousin, Colonel Fitzwilliam, in London, and from his bedroom in Hanover Square he can see the comings and goings of the Viscount and Viscountess Lambert. This story is set four years after that disastrous proposal at Hunsford. Continue reading »

May 282018
 

Hello readers! Today I’m so excited to welcome two contributing authors of the recently published Austenistan anthology to Austenesque Reviews!!! For those of you who are unfamiliar with it, Austenistan is a collection of short stories written by various members of the Jane Austen Society of Pakistan (JASP) and edited by Laaleen Sukhera! The collection consists of seven stories inspired by Jane Austen and set in contemporary Pakistan. I don’t know about you, friends, but I think this sounds terrific and wonderfully unique! 🙂 I’m so thrilled to have contributing writer and editor, Laaleen Sukhera, and contributing writer, Saniyya Gauhar, stop by for a little tête-à-tête.

Welcome, ladies! How about we begin by talking about Jane Austen! When and where did you first discover Jane Austen? Did you fall in love with her novels right away?

Laaleen: I did, yes. I grew up surrounded by books and had an early affinity for classics. My English aunt gave me my first set of Austens on my twelfth birthday and the very first one I read was Pride and Prejudice. I remember being fixated by the banter between Lizzie, Darcy and Caroline Bingley at that scene at Netherfield—I didn’t actually find Darcy crush-worthy until Colin Firth later portrayed him. Other first impressions of her novels: getting amused by Sir Walter Elliot keenly reading Debrett’s Peerage, relating to Catherine Morland, finding Anne Elliot a little sad, comparing Fanny Price to Jane Eyre, and preferring Willoughby’s glamour to Colonel Brandon’s decency. But of course, I was a child myself then.

Saniyya: I first discovered Jane Austen when I was twelve years old – Pride & Prejudice was required reading for our class and I started reading it very reluctantly because I never enjoyed books that school made us read! However, I found myself reading beyond the chapters that the teacher set and I still remember how Darcy’s first proposal took me by complete surprise- I really wasn’t expecting it and my reaction was to put the book down, smile and go “Wow!” Continue reading »