Dec 112017
 

Happy Monday, friends!  As you may recall I read and reviewed the anthology all about bad boys, Dangerous to Know: Jane Austen’s Rakes & Gentlemen Rogues, last month and I liked it just a teensy bit (okay, I absolutely adored it!)  Today, I have one of the authors of that lovely anthology stopping by for a visit!  Jenetta James has written some remarkable works (her Austen-Inspired story The Elizabeth Papers was one of my favorites for 2016!) and was thrilled to see her lovely story in Dangerous to Know!

Thank you Meredith, for having me back to Austenesque Reviews. It is always a pleasure and an honour to visit your lovely blog. This week, I am talking about my short story “The Lost Chapter in the Life of William Elliot” in the anthology Dangerous to Know: Jane Austen’s Rakes & Gentlemen Rogues. Those who have read the story will know that Meredith is actually in it in recognition of her generous support for Hurricane Relief.

The idea of the anthology was to take each of one Austen’s baddies, (as my children would call them), and give them a back story. Readers will recall the fortune hunting, scheming, opportunist Elliot from Persuasion. He is a character who appears to pick up his relations when it is to his advantage and drop them without a care when it is not. Of the gallery of cads on offer, he struck me as among the least redeemable characters, and that is what appealed to me about him. I can’t say that my story redeems him, I don’t think it does. But I suppose that it is an attempt at explaining the man behind the roguery.

I have always loved theatre and since I see William Elliot as a man constantly putting on an act, I decided to give him a pre-Persuasion story in the world of the stage. During the Regency, there were three theatres in London with “letters patent” (that is to say that they could call themselves “Theatre Royal”). Amazingly, they were lit entirely by candlelight (until 1817 when gaslight started to be used) and were enormously popular. There were stars of the stage, just as there are now and a rich tradition of noblemen and wealthy patrons becoming romantically entangled with those stars. So, without further ado, here is an excerpt from my story, in which Mr William Elliot, gentleman and widower steps into the world of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane… Continue reading »

Dec 062017
 

GP

Hi friends!  I’m always so happy when authors come and pay a visit to Austenesque Reviews, especially when they are new authors!  🙂  Today I am very happy to have author Andreea Catana as my guest!  Her new Pride and Prejudice variation Meant to Be was just released recently, and I love the sound of it because Darcy and Elizabeth meet for the first time at Rosings rather than at Meryton!  I can’t wait to see how that changes their story! 😉  Andreea is here to share her first encounter with and impressions of Jane Austen.  We hope you enjoy!

I have met Jane Austen and I have written a book. It’s called Meant to Be.

Yes, I have met Jane Austen.

Of course, not in my lifetime, nor in hers, – for such travels are for the moment impossible – but I can confidently say that we have met. I shall try in the course of a few pages to tell you how I have known her and what she has thought me.

I made Jane Austen’s acquaintance when I was ten and she was already famous for more than a hundred years. My mom adored her (and her books) and naturally thought that I might like her as well.

However, my first impression of Jane Austen, which I got from the picture at the end of the book, was that she seemed like a lady who was a little bit too severe, like a scolding aunt that never allows you to play at will or expects you to behave a certain proper way. And since my reading interest had been up to that moment mostly stories about the wild Indian jungles and about inspiring, yet melodramatic Victorian orphans, I was a little bit cautious that I might enjoy the story my mother presented to me. Pride and Prejudice The very title sounded mature for me, with some concepts I did not fully comprehend.

But I opened the book and there it was, the most famous sentence in literary history:

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”  Continue reading »

Dec 032017
 

Hi readers! I am very excited to welcome Audrey Ryan, author of a recently released modern-day adaptation of Pride and Prejudice titled, All the Things I Know, to Austenesque Reviews today! All the Things I Know is Ms. Ryan’s debut release with Meryton Press and this post begins her blog tour! Today Audrey visits Austenesque Reviews to chat with you all about writing, her new release, and Jane Austen!

Welcome, Audrey! Thank you so much for visiting my blog! Since you are a new author to me and some of my readers, how about we start off with you telling us a little bit about yourself. How long have you been writing? When did you first encounter Jane Austen?

Thank you for the warm welcome — I’m very excited to start off my blog tour at Austenesque Reviews! I’ve been writing since I learned how to put pen to page. I’ve always loved telling stories. When I was a kid, one of my favorite things to do was make little story books and as I grew older, I kept writing short stories. I was an English major in college and took the writing track. I had thought I could be like J.K. Rowling or Stephen King and live off my novels, but I never actually finished any of the novels I started till now!

I first learned about Jane Austen when the 1995 P&P came out and all the older ladies in my life swooned over Colin Firth. I didn’t actually read Austen till I was in college, but I didn’t grow to love Austen till after. I lost my mom suddenly when I was 24. A few months later, my family took a roadtrip down to Los Angeles to see my dad’s family. We were hanging out with my great aunt and uncle, who were big readers, and my great aunt Naomi mentioned that whenever she felt like she needed cheering up, she would re-read Pride & Prejudice. When we got home, I took her advice. This also led me to read or re-read all of Austen’s novels. It was a great source of comfort. Continue reading »