Feb 282010
 

Nine Enchanting and Brilliant Short Stories

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Source: Purchased

Intimations of Austen, by Jane Greensmith is a delightful and diverting compilation of short stories, what-if scenarios, prequels, etc. about the novels of Jane Austen. This enchanting and diverse mix draws from each of Jane Austen’s major novels and are written with elegance and a keen understanding of her works.

Here is what you will find:

1. Rainbow Around The Moon: (sequel to Persuasion) a short and solemn tale about Captain Wentworth and his daughter.

2. Three Sisters: (prequel to Mansfield Park) an insightful story that shows you how some Austen characters are more closely related than we first thought.

3. The Last Baby: (sequel to Pride and Prejudice) hear Mrs. Bennet’s reflections of her life after her last daughter is married and she and Mr. Bennet are left with an empty nest. (one of my favorites, wonderfully done!!)

4. Bird of Paradise: (sequel to Mansfield Park) Fanny struggles with confidence and assertiveness as the new Mrs. Edmund Bertram.

5. The Color of Love: (summary of Pride and Prejudice from Mr. Darcy’s point of view) Mr. Darcy sees different colors in each persons handwriting, the colors have a special meaning.

6. Remember That We Are English: (part of Northanger Abbey from Mr. Tilney’s perspective). See what was going through Henry’s mind as he anticipates his father’s realization that Catherine doesn’t have the large dowry or inheritance that he expects.

7. When Fates Conspire: (prequel to Persuasion) Captain Wentworth learns who or what prompted his return to Kellynch Hall and why it happened.

8. Heaven Can Wait: (part of Pride and Prejudice from Jane Bennet’s point-of-view) Remember in P&P when it said that Jane had a suitor when she was 15 who wrote her some poetry? This is an elaboration on who that suitor was and what really happened to him. (another of my favorites!)

9. All I Do: (sequel to Pride and Prejudice) In this tale of Pride and Prejudice Elizabeth is NOT married to Darcy! (There’s a first, huh?) This heartrending and emotional tale was the most longest story, encompassing about 40 pages of the book. It was my favorite in this enchanting collection because of how poignant and emotional the story was as well as its longer length.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys sequels, para-literature, or fan-fiction of Jane Austen. These short stories are light, insightful, and creative. I greatly wish for Jane Greensmith to write more Intimations of Austen, and I eagerly wait for the day when I can hold a new volume of works by Jane Greensmith in my hand.

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  7 Responses to “Intimations of Austen – Jane Greensmith”

  1.  

    I’ve already expressed my appreciation for this collection of 9 Austenesque gems. This is the type of Austen based fiction I love: sensitive, respectful and, especially, well written! I too would like to read more and hope Jane Greensmith will share more of her talent.

  2.  

    I havent heard of this book, it sounds very nice. I love the sound of All I Do! Beautiful.

  3.  

    These stories have really stayed with me, even though I have only read them once (I should remedy that). They have been sources of inspiration for my own writing and I see echoes of them in that of so many others. My favorites are Three Sisters, The Last Baby, and Heaven Can Wait.

  4.  

    I also enjoyed this Austenesque short story collection. I look forward to a full novel from Greensmith.

  5.  

    I’ll have to get a copy of this one.

    Oh! I’m posting a review of Carrie Bebris’ new Mr. And Mrs. Darcy mystery tonight.

  6.  

    I highly recommend it to you, Brooke. I’m on my way to check out your new review!

  7.  

    This book is delight to read! Very well written indeed. What I liked best were the subtle connections that Jane Greensmith made between Austen’s works. I highly recommend this too.

    Aruna

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